Slip stitch dish towels

by onblueberryhill on July 14, 2013

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This project was a beautiful way to show off different stitch patterns and tonal color combinations, and it was also an ideal summer knitting project, because knitting with linen is much better than wool on hot days!  I used the free Purl Bee patterns here and followed the instructions without modifications.

The yarn is Louet’s Euroflax, and I chose the color kit with cream, natural, and pewter (although I loved the kit in the blues, too).  I knit on US 3s, and was happy with the drape and density of the resulting fabric.

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Because knitting three of these got a little monotonous, I paced myself, setting a goal for a certain number of inches each day.  It would have been a breeze to just knit one, but one’s the point of one dish towel?  I liked all three patterns, but I think that the three-and-one tweed pattern is my favorite – which is ironic, because it’s the one I made a mistake on.  Because of the repetition of the pattern without a break, you can really see where I got off course.  Unfortunately, I didn’t notice until I was way too far along to be interested in frogging it back to the error row; it really bothered me for a while, and then I just decided, those little variations are the beauty of hand knits!

This is the three-and-one tweed pattern:

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This is the basket stitch pattern:

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And this is the triple L tweed pattern:

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Per the yarn instructions, I machine washed and dried the finished dish towels; it definitely softened up the yarn, although I’ll have to wash and dry them numerous times in order to really get a feel for how the fabric ultimately wears.  Unfortunately, while the dryer softened the yarn nicely, it also tweaked the shape and made the sides curl, so I re-wet them and dried them on a blocking board.  Nice-looking finish, but very rough!  So, I guess you either get soft and shapeless, or rough-feeling perfect rectangles :)  The upside to the rough feeling, though, is that I think that they’ll dry a lot more effectively than many hand sewn dish towels I’ve made.

My goal is to actually make myself use them – it’s hard to put to hard and dirty work something I’ve spent so much time and effort to make, but what’s the point of making beautiful things with thought and care, if they just end up sitting in the closet, waiting for a special occasion?  I’m a big believer in the philosophy of using your “special” things every day, since it is the every days that, taken together, become the special times in life . . .

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Sheryl July 28, 2013 at 8:03 pm

These are great! You make me want to make them despite my aversion to knitting with cotton!

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Carolyn Buttram August 6, 2013 at 2:19 am

Very nice work! I plan to knit them as well, for some of the special things in life. Recently, a dear neice married, and I thought a set would make the ideal Wedding Gift. The linen can virtually last a life time, becoming softer, and softer with use and laundering (ironing is ideal for linen, the oldest plant fiber in history). The pattern for the three towels calls for 4, 230yd hanks, (1, 1, 2) of Louet. I plan to use a linen that ks hanked in 170yd hanks. Do you recall the quantities ACTUALLY USED for the three designs, were there any colors remaining? Thank you. I can also be reached on Ravelry as: knit-faced.

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Jojo August 21, 2013 at 12:38 pm

Just popped over here from Purl site to see your dishcloths in the natural color way. I love them. And I like seeing the size. Your photos themselves are wonderful and inspiring. I think these will be a terrific Christmas gift for the kids.

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